3 thoughts on “Morocco. 1982”

  1. Guatemala and Morocco in the ’80s. It was a good time for travel, eh? I mean, it was do-able. At that point, it was VHS, not computers, that was changing the world. I remember being in Puno, Peru then and feeling sad because a man with a TV and a tape player was advertising a showing of “Rambo” that night. Now it is all internet cafes. This is not a bad thing, but cultural differences are disappearing. Part of me wants to “preserve” the world as it was so I can go observe. I have taken away many values from my past travels. As the world loses its biodiversity, it loses its cultural diversity, too. I wonder often if I honored the world I photographed or if I simply made it a spectacle. Even NYC has become like Everywhere, USA. Well, I won’t work it all out here, but thanks for the photos of these magnificent people. You show me people in places and times that I wish I had known.

  2. “Guatemala and Morocco in the ’80s. It was a good time for travel, eh?”

    It’s funny that you should say that. When I was in Morocco I felt as though I’d arrived 10 years too late. When I first went to Bali in 1974 I had the same feeling. I felt that I’d come too late and it had somehow been spoilt.

    About 4 years ago I went back to Bali, and sure enough things and “progress” had moved on, but I was delighted to see that it still had a lot of its original charm and I really enjoyed going back there again.

    I wonder what Wilfred Thesiger would’ve made of the Gulf States nowadays if he were still alive?

  3. All the places I’d really like to visit come with a time period. I’ve always wanted to see mid-sixties San Francisco, late seventies NYC, mid-fifties Havana, etc.

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