Category Archives: People

The Brickpit Ring Walk. Homebush Bay, Sydney, Australia

Before the Sydney Olympics (best Olympics ever, don’tcha know?) in 2000, the Homebush Bay area was basically a toxic dump marshland that had been polluted for the past 100 years by various heavy industries.  Much of the site had to have the topsoil removed and it was going to be completely built over. Near the centre of the Olympic site is an old unused brick pit that had been used as a location for the third “Mad Max” movie “Beyond Thunderdome“. It turns out that the water filled brick pit was the habitat of an endangered species of frog, known as the Green and Golden Bell Frog (Litoria aurea). The presence of the rare frog led to the brick pit being preserved as a habitat for the frogs.  Now the brickpit isn’t the prettiest thing to have in the middle of an Olympic park so some money was thrown it’s way and an amazing ring walk was built in the middle of it.

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The ring walk, designed by Durbach Block Architects,  is 550m (1800ft) in circumference and 18.5m (60ft) above the ground. The Ring Walk is truly a fantastic solution to preserving habitat whilst still allowing people to enjoy public space. It’s nice to see that our government is starting to realize that cities need to be “livable”. The whole Homebush Bay area is covered with cycling paths and I go cycling at there quite often with my wife, and friend Paul. The brickpit is one my favourite places in the whole of the Olympic park.

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 My friend Paul is an aficionadao of technology (otherwise known as “shiny kit syndrome”) and as such he has the latest bright and shiny things, such as a beautifully made folding German bicycle called a “Birdy”.  Everytime I struggle to get my and my wife’s bike in and out of our car I’m jealous of how easily Paul assembles and disassembles his. All very civilised.

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On a technical note the photos were taken with another of Paul’s shiny things, an I-mate JAMin telephone. Whilst the telephone doesn’t take as good photos as my camera, it had the advantage of being with us, as opposed to my camera, which was sitting at home.

Edward Arteaga, composer. Vancouver, BC, Cananda

I’ve known Edward Arteaga from the early eighties when we both used to work in the theater, Ed as a lighting technician and I as a set builder.

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Ed composes modern music for orchestra and he regularly collaborates with choreographer Paula Ross.

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On a visit to Vancouver last year I got a chance to catch up with Ed and his family.

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Ed has always walked a different path to most other people and his house reflects that.

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Joseph Cindric the Sydney “Trolleyman”. Sydney Austalia 1973

Cindric (1906-1994) pushed his trolley around Hyde Park in Sydney for over twenty years. Rumor had it that Joseph not only carried all his worldly goods in his trolley but also letters from his long lost son.

I was looking through my old negatives when I can across this image. His humble smile started me thinking about what kind of person was he. So I thought I’d look for more information about him on the net and I noticed that there weren’t any images of him in cyberspace or that much information for that matter. So I thought that I should put his picture up so the world can put a face to one of Sydney’s better-known characters from the end of the last century.

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I’ve been noticing lately that the Internet is full of articles about the very famous from the last one and a half decades. The occasional scholarly historical article, usually dealing with very famous dead people, can also be found. What the Internet seems to lack is articles about local histories. I’m convinced that in our headlong rush into the future many interesting people and events are being left undocumented and our daily lives are being made all the poorer for it.